Tag Archive | 1700’s

The Bride Who Got Lucky by Janna MacGregor–5 Stars–Book Review

The Bride who go lucky:850.jpg

Don’t Miss Janna MacGregor’s Newest 5-Star Release, Coming 10/31/17!

 

I thoroughly enjoyed this well-written historical fiction romance. This novel explores the harsh realities of what it was like for a woman in the 1700s to be trapped in an abusive marriage. Women during this time had very few rights, and when they married, they lost what little rights they had. Emma felt guilty over her friend Lena’s death. She knew that Lena’s husband had abused her. Unfortunately, the last time Lena had asked Emma for help, she’d been busy. Lena died that night, and Emma has been shackled with guilt ever since.

Emma was convinced that Lena’s husband had murdered her friend. She tried to persuade Lena’s maid, Mary to testify against the cruel man. But since husbands held all of the rights in a marriage, people, including Mary, turned their back on Emma’s request for help; even Nick, her own husband. Emma was determined to have her life count for something. She wanted to help abused women escape their harsh fate. She was determined to help them have choices, and to even start a new life, if necessary. Emma loved her husband and hated crossing him, but avenging Lena’s death, was just too important to her, to let go.

Little did Emma know, though, that Nick was also, doing some soul searching. Forgiveness would not come easy for him, but forgiving was exactly what Nick needed to do, to heal his heart. Would Nick go against everything he based his life on, and forgive? He didn’t think that was possible, but neither was living without Emma. This was just the type of heartache Nick had always tried to guard against.

This well-written book is captivating, touching, as well as, heart-wrenching. The Bride Who Got Lucky is a story well told. I loved it.

Thank you, St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley, for my advanced review copy.

~5 out of 5 stars~ Review by Peg Glover

 

Amazon               B&N               iBooks               Kobo               Google Play

 

 

The Return by Suzanne Woods Fisher

The Return:850.jpg
Don’t Miss This Fabulous New Release by Suzanne Woods Fisher!

 

The Return is a fascinating story depicting the unrest in Pennsylvania during the 1700s between the early settlers, Amish and the Indians.

Bairn Bauer was a well known Amish Pastor in Lancaster County. He was, however, according to many of his parishioners, too liberal with the Indians. Bairn and his wife treated the Indians the same as they would treat anyone; with kindness and respect. John Elder, a Scots-Irish preacher, didn’t share Bairn Bauer’s beliefs at all, and regularly stirred up trouble.

Tessa Bauer, the preacher’s daughter was often teased about being freakishly tall and outspoken. She felt, however, that her height and impolite mannerisms were the least of her faults. Her problem was jealousy. The man she loved, had eyes only for her friend Betsy. She was beautiful, kind, and petite. Tessa often wished that her friend would just disappear. And then, to everyone’s surprise, she did.

When Betsy was taken by the Indians, Tessa was torn up with guilt. The guilt she felt however, didn’t stop her from going after Hans. Although, she loved being with Hans, Tessa knew that his heart still belonged to Betsy. Unfortunately, wishing Betsy gone, was not the worse thing, jealousy would drive Tessa to do.

Caleb, a half-breed Indian took Betsy under his wing and helped her through a difficult transition. Caleb believed himself to be a nobody, but in reality, he was the most amazing character in the book. He sacrificed and put himself in danger, to help others, again and again, and never asked for anything in return.

This is the first book that I have read by this author, but it won’t be my last. The writing is superb, and the story, uplifting and captivating. The book touches on many subjects, such as: love, trusting God, the danger of prejudice and jealousy, and the healing balm of forgiveness.

Thank you, Revell publishing and NetGalley, for my advanced review copy. I loved it!

~5 out of 5 stars~ Review by Peg Glover

Amazon               B&N               iBooks

 

 

 

*The Valley* by Helen Bryan*5-Stars

The Valley

The Valley is the first book in Helen Bryan’s exciting new historical fiction trilogy. I found this book to be thoroughly enjoyable and captivating.

The story begins with Sophie Grafton, the heroine, as a child. She’s an English Viscount’s spoiled daughter, who is horribly obstinate and impossible to control. The Viscount paid Sophie’s care-givers exorbitant salaries just to keep them from quitting. Although, Sophie did eventually grow to be a beautiful and charming young lady, she never did lose her stubborn, bossy streak.

The story intensifies after Sophie, discovers, to her horror, that her beautiful home is no longer hers. To avoid becoming a pauper, Sophie is forced to travel to America to claim her father’s land in Virginia. After many tiresome months of treacherous travel, Sophie is shocked and devastated by the condition of her so-called Virginia homestead.

The author does an exceptional job describing life as a pioneer, in the 1700’s. I felt as if I was in the story, with the characters, wandering through the wilderness, enduring harsh winters, guarding against wild animals, and fearing Indian raids.

I found The Valley to be well-written, compelling and humorous. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.

I received this ARC from the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.

5 out of 5 stars~Review by Peg Glover

*The Kitchen House*by Kathleen Grissom*5-Stars

The kitchen house is a beautifully written, powerful and moving novel.

The Kitchen House

This emotional and heart-wrenching story is told from two viewpoints, Lavinia, an Irish indentured servant, and her adoptive mother, a black slave. The Kitchen House takes place in Virginia, on Tall Oaks Plantation, during the late1700s and early1800’s.

Lavinia was only seven-years-old when she was bought by Captain Pike. Her parents had died during the voyage to America from Ireland on one of his ships. Captain Pike placed the traumatized child in the care of his secret daughter, Belle, one of his Kitchen House black slaves. Lavinia quickly grew to love her new adopted family. It wasn’t until ten years later that she would realize what it truly meant to be owned, black, and working, in the fields of a rich man’s plantation.

Captain Pike, was not an evil slave master, but his overseer was. Captain Pike was rarely home, so he didn’t have a true picture of what was happening on his plantation. If he did, he would have stopped the inhuman treatment of his slaves by the overseer. And he certainly would have never allowed his son Marshall to be taken advantage of and abused by the tutor he hired. But Captain Pike wasn’t around, and these things did occur.

At age seventeen, Lavinia was freed from her indentured servanthood. She quickly married into the family and became the mistress of Tall Oaks Plantation. Her goal was to make a better life for the slaves. She had always treated them like family. Unfortunately, as a mistress, she was no longer permitted to treat black slaves as equals. Any kindnesses she showed towards them were swiftly met with a harsh beating from her husband. The slaves of Tall Oaks didn’t abandon Lavinia during this dark period of her life. They stood by her until she was no longer just a beaten down shell of a person.

The kitchen house is not for the faint-hearted. Each page is filled with raw emotion, as it portrays for the reader, a realistic view of slavery, in all of its hateful, brutal ugliness.

5 out of 5 stars~Review by Peg Glover

*The Constable’s Tale*5-Stars* by Donald Smith-Don’t Miss it!

The Constable's Tale

The Constable’s Tale is a compelling and meticulously crafted historical fiction novel. Donald Smith crafts this eighteen-century story with numerous sharp and authentic details. I felt as if I was living during the 1700’s in early America instead of just reading about it.

Harry Woodyard, the Constable of Craven County in North Carolina, was troubled by the fact that the Indian, Comet Elijah, was the prime suspect in the murder of a local family, and jailed. Harry believed that the Indian, who had mentored him as a child, couldn’t possibly have had anything to do with such brutality. To track down the killer, though, Harry knew that he would have to leave Craven County without the judge’s consent. The consequences, of taking such an action, would probably cost him his position as Constable. He was also aware that proving Comet Elijah’s innocence could take months, which was something that the elderly Indian just didn’t have.

Harry left Craven County and his wife on what he hoped would not end up being just a wild goose chase. The clues led Harry to travel to Virginia first, Boston second, and then finally up to Quebec Canada where the French and Indian War was in full force.

The Constable’s Tale is a story of political intrigue, espionage, and war, as well as a story of love, betrayal and a bit of romance. The dialogue and characters in this book are both realistic and engaging. There wasn’t a boring page in the entire novel. I highly recommend reading The Constable’s Tale.

I received this book free in exchange for an honest review.

~5 out of 5 stars~ Review by Peg Glover